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Posts Tagged ‘review’

Happy New Year to everyone celebrating Rosh Hashanah.

As shared in previous posts, I enjoy reading books and articles on leadership and business topics as part of my own professional development. They often serve as inspiration for many ideas and initiatives which are currently established here at the firm. I recently read The Real-Life MBA: Your No-BS Guide to Winning the Game, Building a Team, and Growing Your Career, authored by Jack & Suzy Welch. Jack Welch, as you may know, is the legendary former-CEO of General Electric who was named “Manager of the Century” by Fortune magazine in 2000. His wife, Suzy Welch, is a bestselling author, television commentary and noted business journalist. The book is chock full of sound business advice, with six key learning opportunities which I felt are most applicable to every professional in our firm, relating to Team Alignment, Growth, Leadership, Marketing B2B, Building a Winning Team and Getting Unstuck in Your Career.  I’d like to share a little about each through this and five additional future messages.

Let’s start with Team Alignment, which means more than simply a group of people who are in agreement. Alignment reflects an active ownership on the part of the team members, with each individual understanding and contributing to the goals, vision, and solution of top challenges. And Leadership is the driver to galvanizing the kind of alignment that takes the grind out of work.  Here are a few points the Welch’s share to get your teams successfully aligned:

  1. Getting into everyone’s skincaring passionately about your people and understanding what makes them tick. If you want to inspire even more good stuff happening within your team, you need to truly get to know and care about your people as individuals. Your people give their days (and sometimes their nights) to you. They give their hands, brains and hearts. Sure, they are paid a salary to do so. But as a leader, you need to fill their souls. As a firm, we are more than happy to reimburse expenses related to lunches or activities with your staff with the intent to build stronger relationships.
  2. Serving as the Chief Meaningful Officer – using words and deeds to give your team’s work context and purpose. Remember, your people spend more than 40 hours a week working. If you’re not helping them make meaning of that investment, you’re wasting their time and their lives. Be aspirational in your tone with your team members. They want to be a part of something bigger than themselves.
  3. Removing blockages – clearing bureaucracy and other nonsense out of the way of your team’s path to results. A leader’s job is to sweep away those things which stand in the way of a team reaching its target. That includes people, too: the action blockers, the change resistors, the process obsessives. There’s always a way to create work-arounds for most anything so your team members can achieve their goals. And there are certainly plenty of people within our firm with a wealth of “people experience” to assist you in this area if needed.
  4. Demonstrating the generosity gene – going over-the-top in your desire and effort to reward people for great performance, using money, promotions and praise. One of my favorite things about the State of the Firm event is to recognize talented, loyal staff with our Strength Awards and Milestone Awards, also giving them a monetary gift. But remember, a simple ‘thank you’ or an announcement during a team meeting sharing praise about a job well done is free and goes a long way. And don’t forget about the Gotcha Awards!
  5. Making sure the work is fun – creating an environment of enjoyment and celebration. “Work Hard-Play Hard” is part of the Withum Way culture, and I think we do a pretty good job of having a good time while also providing the world-class service our clients expect. We embrace humor and candor; we do things outside of the office to build camaraderie; we do our best to adhere to our ‘no jerk’ policy and maintain a familial atmosphere. Every leader in our firm should help nurture this very important behavior.

I hope you enjoyed this first installment of the thought leadership coming from The Real Life MBA.

Have a great week!

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As part of my own professional development, I enjoy reading books and articles on leadership topics. They often serve as inspiration for many ideas and initiatives which are currently established here at the firm. Whether written by world-renown leadership authors such as Jim Collins or Patrick Lencioni, or by the CEOs of powerhouse companies such as Zappos or Starbucks, you can always find at least one gem of an idea which can be applied to how you might think differently; approach a challenge from a different perspective; or how to inspire the people around you to reach new heights alongside you.

Our partner Tom Basilo forwarded me the email below discussing “divine discontent” the “agnostic habits” shared by global advertising firm Ogilvy and Mather, which sounded very much like the Withum Way philosophy we embrace here. I like the phrase, “divine discontent,” which is an inner urging that calls us forth to our next growth opportunity. Yet, so often we ignore it or procrastinate on listening to it.

To: The Great Leaders Who Have a Passion for Continuous Learning

“We have a divine discontent with our performance. It is an antidote to smugness.” These words, written by David Ogilvy, Founder of Ogilvy and Mather International Advertising Company, are the company’s guiding philosophy – one that shapes the corporate culture instilling a passion for creativity, innovation and performance excellence. The company and people embrace Ogilvy’s eight habits that inspire and sustain this creative spirit and passion to achieve excellence. He says that these are agnostic habits “required in all our disciplines and are, by no means, proprietary to advertising.”

  • Courage – Standing up for what you believe (this habit is the foundation for the others creating a strong foundation for trust).
  • Idealism – How great you become depends on the size of your dreams.
  • Curiosity – Explain, dream and create.
  • Playfulness – Be childlike; have fun; enjoy life.
  • Candor – Be terribly, terribly honest and dedicated to the truth.
  • Intuition – Listen to the invisible guru inside of you; go beyond pure logic.
  • Free-Spiritedness – Two rules: Rule #1: There are no rules; Rule #2: Never forget Rule #1. Be a free-thinker; be an alchemist.
  • Persistence – Persistence and determination are omnipotent, always making it better, in search of the best.

I hope this list of admirable habits inspires your inner “divine discontentment” to move you in a positive, upward direction… in your career and in life.

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With tax season behind us and most everyone having taken some time to recuperate, we now shift our focus and attention to completing “upward” and “downward” evaluations.  I cannot express enough how important this process is to the professional development of our staff at every level, from Staff I to Partner, and from every administrative department.  When done constructively and honestly, it is likely the most effective tool we offer for identifying the strengths and weaknesses of our staff in order to help them grow in their careers in a positive, productive direction.

The points below reflect important factors to consider when completing the evaluations.  These apply to both “upward” and “downward” reviews.

  • It is natural when doing the reviews to think about constructive criticism and ways for people to improve, but just as important is making sure you comment and illustrate areas where people excel and where they do a great job.  The evaluation presents a great opportunity to give a “pat on the back” that is deserved which motivates people to do an even better job.
  • When offering constructive criticism, remember that the goal is to encourage a change in behavior.  Mean-spirited and rude comments are either taken too personally causing hurt feelings, or are just flat out ignored.  After writing the comment, think about how you would react if the comment was given to you.
  • The goal is to provide honest feedback to each person as a professional.  This is not a popularity contest.  We encourage “grading” everyone based upon the question and their job performance and not personal feelings.  If you do not rate honestly, ratings become over- or under-inflated and therefore less meaningful.
  • Bad performance cannot be improved, nor will good performance be sustained, if the person doesn’t know about it.
  • Honest, written documentation is essential where performance problems exist.  Performance reviews completed honestly provide important supporting documentation to help justify a person’s raise or promotion (or lack thereof).

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